AMERICAN SOCIETY OF SAFETY ENGINEERS

1800 East Oakton Street
Des Plaines, Illinois 60018-2187

847.699.2929
FAX 847.296.3769
www.asse.org

April 25, 2002

Robert Burchard
RCRA Information Center
Office of Solid Waste (5305G)
US Environmental Protection Agency
Ariel Rios Building
1200 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW
Washington, DC 20460-0002

VIA E-MAIL: rcra-docket@epamail.epa.gov

RE: Docket Number F-1999-IBRA-
FFFFF: Environmental Protection Agency Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Burden Reduction Initiative Proposed Rule (67 FR 2517)

 

 


Dear Mr. Burchard:

The American Society of Safety Engineers (ASSE) respectfully requests that the following comments be included in the record of the Environmental Protection Agency’s Proposal Rule of January 17, 2002 (67 FR 2517) concerning the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Burden Reduction Initiative. The Proposed Rule lists a variety of ideas for reducing the burden imposed by reporting and recordkeeping requirements under RCRA.

Established in 1911, ASSE is the oldest and, with more than 30,000 members, by far the largest association representing safety, health and environmental professionals. A fact sheet that further describes the Society’s commitment to supporting our member’s efforts to ensuring safe and healthy workplaces accompanies this letter.

ASSE is specifically concerned with the paragraphs entitled "Certified Hazardous Materials Managers" under Section III of the Proposed Rule at page 2529. There, EPA proposes to modify most RCRA certification requirements to allow a person who is a "Certified Hazardous Materials Manager" (CHMM) to make certifications of hazardous waste facilities. The language in the Proposed Rule goes on to say that the CHMM

is accredited by the Council on Engineering and Scientific Specialties Board, which also accredits…certified safety professionals. The (CHMM) must have a combination of education and hands-on work experience at a hazardous waste facility, pass a closed book examination, continue their professional education, and follow a code of ethics.

While an individual with a CHMM designation is well qualified to certify hazardous waste facilities, so are Certified Safety Professionals (CSPs). The Proposed Rule too narrowly defines who may perform this work and, if not amended, will unfairly keep qualified professionals from certifying hazardous waste facilities that they already perform and unnecessarily limit the availability of professional resources to hazardous waste facility owners and managers.

The Board of Certified Safety Professionals (BCSP) administers a widely accepted and internationally recognized professional certification offering the designation of CSP. Applicants must satisfy stringent formal education, work experience, and continuing education requirements for maintenance of the designation. Individuals are also required to complete two comprehensive day-long examinations, adhere to a written code of ethics, and continue maintenance of their certification through other educational means. Currently, there are over 10,000 CSPs in the United States. In ASSE, over 7,000 of our members are considered "professional members," many of whom are CSPs.

Inherent in the knowledge and preparation any individual must have to become a CSP is a thorough and professional understanding of hazardous waste management. To serve as a demonstration of the wide breadth of professional competency that a CSP must have in order to earn this designation, attached please find a detailed description of all the areas tested in the CSP examination. This document is excerpted from the latest BCSP Candidate Handbook, which is available online at www.bscp.org. Inherent in each area of expertise that must be demonstrated is the proficiency in dealing with hazardous materials. Management and certification competency is also tested. Simply put, a CSP is capable of performing the professional responsibilities that a CHMM would be expected to do in a hazardous waste facility.

Most important is to note that both the CHMM and the CSP designations are accredited by at least one of the nationally recognized independent accrediting bodies overseeing such professional designations in safety – the CESB, which is recognized in the Proposed Rule, and the National Commission on Certifying Agencies (NCCA). While we certainly urge you to amend the Proposed Rule so that the designations acceptable for providing professional services with regard to hazardous waste facilities are not inappropriately limited, any such inclusion of designations must be based on the recognition of these accrediting bodies. Unfortunately, there are designations in the safety field that are not so recognized, and the Society would urge that they not be referenced in any federal regulation, which would diminish the intended effectiveness of the rule.

Again, ASSE urges that the CSP designation be included in a Final Rule. While we

understand EPA’s efforts to identify qualified individuals to perform the important safety work involved in certifying hazardous waste facilities, the Agency should not become the arbiter of one qualified professional over another based on an arbitrary choice of professional. When qualifications are equal, such decisions are best made in the private sector on the basis of individual ability, availability and professional responsibility. Inclusion of CSPs meets these needed characteristics

Sincerely,

M.E. Greer, CSP

Society President 2001-2002

 

 

Board of Certified Safety Professionals

(excerpted from BCSP Candidate Handbook)

TABLE 1. EXAMINATION BLUEPRINTS FOR THE NEW CSP EXAMINATIONS

Domain 1. Safety, Health and Environmental Management

Domain 2. Safety, Health and Environmental Engineering

Domain 3. Safety, Health and Environmental Information Management and Communications

Domain 4. Professional Conduct and Ethics

Domain 1. Safety, Health and Environmental Management
(SAFETY FUNDAMENTALS - 37%   COMPREHENSIVE PRACTICE - 34%)

Responsibility 1. Design comprehensive management systems by defining requirements and developing policies, procedures and programs to protect people, property and the environment.

Knowledge
1. Statutory and case law regulating safety, health and the environment
2. Operational process to design/develop safe work practices
3. Material process flow
4. Safety, health and environmental sciences
5. Design of hazard control systems (i.e. fall protection, scaffolding)
6. Design of record keeping systems that allow for collection, storage, interpretation and dissemination
7. Mathematics and statistics
8. Methods and techniques for achieving safety through design
9. Methods and techniques for accident investigation
10. Property protection (physical and intellectual) and security
11. Organizational theory and behavioral science

Skills
1. Interpreting and applying regulations
2. Applying inspection and control methods for potentially hazardous exposure
3. Mathematical and statistical analysis
4. Analyzing production process hazards
5. Designing safe work practices for systems, facilities and equipment
6. Interpreting and applying safety, health and environmental science data for process improvement
7. Interpersonal communication
8. Problem solving in incident investigation
9. Integrating safety system into the organizational culture
10. Designing effective training programs with emphasis on employee behavior

Responsibility 2. Implement policies, procedures and programs through management systems to protect people, property and the environment.

Knowledge
1. Organization theory and behavioral science
2. Education and training methods
3. Basic sciences: chemistry, biology, physics, physiology and anatomy
4. Safety, health and environmental sciences

Skills
1. Interpersonal communication
2. Teaching and training in safety, health and environmental science areas and how they apply to the management system
3. Utilizing basic science to explain safety, health and environmental issues
4. Developing systems to track implementation
5. Ensuring that delegation of authority and responsibility are in compliance with the management system design

Responsibility 3. Determine the effectiveness of management systems by measuring and evaluating performance indicators to ensure continuous improvement in the protection of people, property and the environment.

Knowledge
1. Quantitative and qualitative performance indicators
2. Mathematics and statistics
3. Basic sciences: chemistry, biology, physics, physiology and anatomy
4. Safety, health and environmental issues
5. Management and behavioral sciences
6. Laws, standards and regulations
7. Safety management systems
8. Education and training methods
9. Auditing techniques and management systems reviews

Skills
1. Applying safety, health and environmental knowledge to determine system effectiveness
2. Mathematical and statistical analysis
3. Applying management and behavioral science to determine system
effectiveness
4. Interpreting regulations to ensure a compliant and effective system
5. Using interpersonal communication
6. Utilizing accepted system safety techniques to compare system to industry/consensus systems
7. Sampling and making observations
8. Improving policies and procedures

Responsibility 4. Implement risk management strategies by using the results of hazard identification and risk analyses to eliminate and/or reduce harmful exposure to people, property and the environment.

Knowledge
1. Laws, standards and regulations
2. Processing operations (e.g., critical inputs, assessment and inventory)
3. Mathematics and statistics
4. Insurance practices (types and premium calculations)
5. Industrial hygiene including chemical, physical and biological agents
6. Safety engineering
7. Safety management
8. Fire prevention and protection including life safety
9. Construction safety
10. Education and training methods
11. Ergonomics program management
12. Transportation/fleet safety management
13. Workers’ compensation and case management
14. Risk management concepts
15. Crisis management
16. Post incident and loss mitigation
17. Behavior modification
18. Safety through design process

Skills
1. Interpreting laws, standards and regulations
2. Mathematical and statistical analysis
3. Analyzing process flow, management of critical paths/systems
4. Quantifying loss data and trends
5. Analyzing sampling results and other data to support decision making and prioritizing control recommendations
6. Organizing the results and recommendations into an effective training program
7. Managing safety through the design processes

Responsibility 5. Apply sound business practices and economic principles for efficient use of resources to increase the value of the safety processes.

Knowledge
1. Business regulations and laws
2. Economics, accounting and statistics
3. Process management, material flow and procurement
4. Personnel development techniques
5. Insurance practices (types and premium calculations)
6. Drug/alcohol programs including Employee Assistance
Programs
7. Capital budgeting and long range planning

Skills
1. Writing job descriptions which include safety accountability as a line item
2. Quantifying the economic value of the safety process
3. Determining the most appropriate drug and alcohol testing programs
4. Acquiring, allocating and controlling human and material resources
5. Using performance evaluations to quantify the effectiveness of employee programs
6. Applying project controls (budgeting, scheduling, estimating) to maximize system efficiency
7. Using capital budgeting techniques, activity-based cost accounting and cost-benefit analysis

Responsibility 6. Encourage participation through communication and other methods to ensure that all stakeholders (e.g., employees, managers, vendors, contractors) have an understanding and an active role in the formulation and implementation of safety processes.

Knowledge
1. Communication and presentation techniques
2. Organizational theory and behavioral science
3. Laws, standards and regulations which require employee
participation
4. Economics and budgeting
5. Management principles
6. Employee participation committees
7. Labor relations, including union/management committees

Skills
1. Communication and presentation
2. Organizational development
3. Interpreting and applying laws, standards and regulations
4. Problem solving
5. Behavior modification techniques
6. Using capital budgeting techniques, activity-based cost
accounting and cost-benefit analysis
7. Implementing employee participation committees
8. Working with unions and management

Domain 2. Safety, Health and Environmental Engineering
(SAFETY FUNDAMENTALS - 25%   COMPREHENSIVE PRACTICE - 31%)

Responsibility 1. Evaluate facilities, products, systems, equipment, workstations and processes by applying qualitative and quantitative techniques to identify the hazards and assess the associated risks.

Knowledge
1. Methods and techniques for evaluation of facilities, products, systems, equipment, workstations and processes
2. Methods and techniques for measurement, sampling and analysis
3. Specifications and drawings
4. Laws, standards and regulations
5. Risk assessment techniques
6. Characteristics and hazards of materials
7. Basic sciences: chemistry, biology, physics, physiology and anatomy
8. Applied engineering sciences: electronics, mechanics,
thermodynamics, materials, structures, plant layout, etc.
9. Industrial hygiene, including chemical physical and biological agents
10. Fire protection and prevention, including life safety
11. Environmental protection and pollution prevention
12. Construction safety
13. System safety
14. Product safety
15. Behavioral sciences
16. Education and training methods
17. Ergonomics and human factors
18. Process safety
19. Physical and chemical characteristics of hazardous materials
20. Equipment and facility safety requirements

Skills
1. Applying methods and techniques for hazard identification, hazard evaluation, risk assessment and control
2. Using analytical equipment: monitoring and sampling equipment
3. Interpreting plans, specifications and drawings
4. Interpreting laws, standards and regulations
5. Consulting with subject-matter experts
6. Consulting with equipment manufacturers/suppliers and construction contractors to assure safety control compliance
7. Benchmarking with other companies in same industry for safety equipment/facility design, engineering and controls

 

Responsibility 2. Recommend controls through design, engineering and specification to eliminate or reduce the risks posed by safety, health and environmental hazards.

Knowledge
1. Laws, standards and regulations
2. Risk management
3. Record keeping, data collection and retrieval systems
4. Materials
5. Basic sciences: chemistry, biology, physics, physiology and anatomy
6. Applied engineering sciences: electronics, mechanics,
thermodynamics, materials, structures, plant layout, etc.
7. Industrial hygiene, including chemical, physical and biological agents
8. Fire protection and prevention, including life safety
9. Environmental protection and pollution prevention
10. Construction safety
11. System safety
12. Product safety
13. Behavioral sciences
14. Education and training methods
15. Ergonomics and human factors
16. Process safety
17. Ventilation system
18. Procurement

Skills
1. Interpreting laws, standards and regulations
2. Applying methods and techniques for hazard identification, hazard evaluation, risk assessment and control
3. Using data collection, retrieval and analysis systems
4. Eliminating or controlling exposure to identified hazards by substitution, engineering or using PPE
5. Consulting with subject matter experts
6. Communicating risks that are present and appropriate control measures to management

Responsibility 3. Evaluate controls by analyzing feasibility, effectiveness, reliability and cost to achieve the optimal solution.

Knowledge
1. Laws, standards and regulations
2. Methods and techniques for evaluating feasibility, effectiveness, reliability and cost-benefit
3. Risk assessment
4. Specifications and drawings
5. Data management
6. Industrial hygiene, including chemical, physical and biological agents
7. Fire protection and protection, including life safety
8. Environmental protection and pollution prevention
9. Construction technology
10. Inspection and auditing techniques
11. System and occupational safety

Skills
1. Interpreting laws, standards and regulations
2. Applying methods and techniques for evaluating feasibility
effectiveness, reliability and cost-benefit
3. Applying economics analysis
4. Interpreting plans, specifications and drawings
5. Performing compliance and conformance inspections and audits
6. Consulting with subject matter experts
7. Using data collection and retrieval systems
8. Interpreting analytical results
9. Testing and maintaining fire detection and suppression systems

 

Responsibility 4. Obtain compliance certifications, listings, approvals or authorizations by identifying and meeting applicable national and international laws, regulations and standards in order to ensure product, process and facility safety.

Knowledge
1. Laws, standards and regulations
2. Data management
3. Quality assurance and control
4. Documentation protocol
5. Certification requirements
6. Appropriate entities to contact for forms, approval and certifications

Skills
1. Interpreting data
2. Interpreting laws, standards and regulations
3. Performing quality assurance audits and inspections
4. Using document processing protocols
5. Managing the approval process
6. Consulting with subject matter experts
7. Meeting with federal, state and local officials

Domain 3. Safety, Health and Environmental Information Management and Communications
(SAFETY FUNDAMENTALS - 33% COMPREHENSIVE PRACTICE - 30%)

Responsibility 1. Develop effective training programs by establishing learning objectives to impart knowledge and facilitate an understanding of hazards and controls.

Knowledge
1. Adult learning
2. Group dynamics
3. Technical content
4. Needs analysis
5. Testing and measurement
6. Presentation media and technologies
7. Graphic design

 

Skills
1. Applying appropriate lesson plans that include interactive learning (e.g., small exchange, case studies, experience sharing)
2. Item/question writing and test construction
3. Using presentation technology: hardware and software
4. Conducting audience needs assessments
5. Facilitating group interactions to maximize learning
6. Making effective graphics
7. Providing an effective learning environment (e.g., classroom layout, lighting, minimal distraction, etc.)
8. Organizing presentation

Responsibility 2. Deliver effective training programs by using media and methods appropriate to the audience to maximize understanding of the subject matter.

Knowledge
1. Presentation media
2. Adult learning
3. Target audience background and informational needs
4. Group dynamics
5. Active learning techniques
6. Conflict resolution techniques

Skills
1. Using presentation technology: hardware and software
2. Using lesson plans
3. Soliciting audience feedback
4. Resolving conflicts
5. Encouraging participation
6. Communicating effectively using verbal and nonverbal skills
7. Integrating critical thinking processing into presentations

Responsibility 3. Evaluate training programs through performance assessments and various forms of feedback in order to assure that training is effective.

Knowledge
1. Testing and measurement
2. Sampling techniques
3. Statistical analysis
4. Item writing and test construction
5. Methods for obtaining feedback

Skills
1. Item/question writing and test construction
2. Using sampling techniques to assess performance
3. Mathematical and statistical analysis
4. Gathering feedback

Responsibility 4. Present technical information, both verbally and in writing, to effectively communicate with employees, management, customers, contractors, public relations officials, vendors and the public.

Knowledge
1. Graphic design
2. Group dynamics
3. English and grammar
4. Format for various types of media
5. Protocols for public announcements
6. Risk assessment techniques
7. Legal aspects of communication

Skills
1. Using graphics, illustrations and other media
2. Audience dynamics
3. Communicating effectively using verbal and nonverbal skills
4. Formatting of technical papers and other media
5. Writing and delivering public announcements
6. Applying risk communication strategies
7. Writing procedures, policies, SOPs, etc.

Responsibility 5. Communicate hazards, risks and control measures to employees, management, customers, contractors, vendors and the public by preparing and delivering appropriate information to educate an organization or the community.

Knowledge
1. Legal aspects of communication
2. Labeling requirement for products, materials and equipment
3. International symbols
4. Symbology (colors, wording, format, presentation)
5. Cultural norms and their relationship to communication

Skills
1. Creating labels and warnings
2. Applying international warnings and symbols
3. Applying proper format: color, lighting, placement, etc.
4. Integrating cultural norms into communications
5. Delivering the information in the language and media appropriate for the audience

Responsibility 6. Develop ongoing relationships with the community by interacting with outside organizations to foster a mutual understanding of the profession and community needs with regards to safety issues.

Knowledge
1. Governmental entities and responsibilities
2. Mutual aid agreements
3. Emergency response planning and communication
4. Standards development
5. Sphere of influence

Skills
1. Establishing and working within mutual aid agreements
2. Planning and implementing emergency response activities
3. Providing input during standards development
4. Negotiating with political entities

Responsibility 7. Maintain a record keeping and data capture and retrieval system by using appropriate data management systems to acquire, analyze and distribute accurate data.

Knowledge
1. Record keeping and recording requirements (e.g., OSHA, EPA, workers’ compensation, hazardous waste permitting and manifesting requirements, DOT)
2. Statistical analysis
3. Computers, data transfer and storage hardware options
4. Data logging and monitoring equipment
5. Business software (e.g., database software)
6. Report development (e.g., training records, accident report forms, inspection forms)
7. Record retention requirements and management protocols (confidentiality, etc.)
8. Data analysis and presentation
9. Chain of custody regard to incident investigation

Skills
1. Managing record keeping (e.g., OSHA, EPA, workers’ compensation, hazardous waste permitting and manifesting requirement requirements, DOT)
2. Mathematical and statistical analysis
3. Using computers, data transfer and storage hardware
4. Using data loggers and monitoring equipment
5. Construction reports and data collection forms
6. Complying with confidentiality requirements
7. Complying with record retention protocols
8. Maintaining data integrity
9. Preserving chain of custody for evidence in incident investigation
10. Calculating accident and incident rates

Responsibility 8. Develop and maintain proficiency in professional communication through continuing personal education in the use of business technology.

Knowledge
1. Computer software concepts (databases, spreadsheets, word processing)
2. Internet resources
3. Information transfer and storage technologies
4. Information acquisition (data logging) technologies
5. Telecommunications technology

Skills
1. Using standards business software
2. Exchanging information via the internet
3. Using information transfer and storage techniques
4. Using data acquisition equipment
5. Using teleconferencing, email and other electronic media

Domain 4. Professional Conduct and Ethics
(SAFETY FUNDAMENTALS - 5% COMPREHENSIVE PRACTICE - 5%)

Responsibility 1. Hold paramount the protection of people, property and the environment by persistently working with management and governmental agencies until the identified hazard has been eliminated or minimized.

Knowledge
1. BCSP Code of Professional Conduct
2. Organizational protocol
3. Conflict resolution techniques
4. Formal and informal presentation techniques
5. Negotiation procedures
6. Laws, standards and regulations

Skills
1. Applying BCSP Code of Professional Conduct
2. Following organizational protocol
3. Resolving conflict
4. Communicating effectively using verbal and nonverbal skills
5. Negotiating compliance issues with government and other entities or affected parties
6. Using laws, standards and regulations as benchmarks

Responsibility 2. Adhere to standards of professional conduct by limiting practice to areas of competence and avoiding conflicts of interest to minimize the potential for harm.

Knowledge
1. BCSP Code of Professional Conduct
2. General business ethics
3. Conflict resolution techniques
4. Personal and professional limitations
5. Methods of facilitating teamwork
6. Competencies of other technical professionals with whom the safety professional interacts
7. Consequences of professional errors or omissions
8. Elements of a conflict of interest policy
9. Laws relating to conflict of interest

Skills
1. Applying BCSP Code of Professional Conduct
2. Applying team building and interpersonal techniques
3. Resolving conflicts through negotiation
4. Selecting consultants and outside resources and providing adequate support

 

Responsibility 3. Accept responsibility to promote safety by providing technical counsel and advice on issues related to the safety profession to protect people, property and the environment.

Knowledge
1. BCSP Code of Professional Conduct
2. Sources safety, health and environmental literature and other
information
3. Job authority, responsibility and accountability
4. Professional liability issues
5. Conflict resolution

Skills
1. Applying BCSP Code of Professional Conduct
2. Avoiding errors and omissions
3. Resolve conflict

 

Responsibility 4. Conduct professional activities by following organizational protocol to assist in making positive, balanced and effective decisions.

Knowledge
1. BCSP Code of Professional Conduct
2. General business ethics
3. Organizational protocol
4. Management principles of accountability and responsibility

Skills
1. Applying BCSP Code of Professional Conduct
2. Following organizational protocol
3. Applying management principles of authority, responsibility and accountability

Responsibility 5. Improve technical competency through continuing professional and self-development in order to increase knowledge and skills.

Knowledge
1. BCSP Code of Professional Conduct
2. Recent technical issues and advances in the safety, health and environmental profession
3. Continuing education sources in the safety, health and environmental profession (e.g., conferences, professional seminars, networking, textbooks, magazines, professional journals)
4. Specialty certification opportunities

Skills
1. Applying BCSP Code of Professional Conduct
2. Selecting appropriate professional development opportunities

 

Responsibility 6. Foster accurate accountability for injuries/illnesses and other types of occurrences by identifying root and contributing causes in order to assure that proper controls are implemented.

Knowledge
1. BCSP Code of Professional Conduct
2. Conflict resolution techniques
3. Methods of identifying accident causation
4. Management principles of authority, responsibility and accountability

Skills
1. Applying BCSP Code of Professional Conduct
2. Performing incident investigations, including root cause analysis
3. Interviewing people
4. Negotiating acceptance and/or ultimately assigning responsibility
5. Applying management principles of authority, responsibility and
accountability

 

American Society of Safety Engineers

(ASSE)

Information Sheet

Protecting people, property and the environment since 1911.

1800 East Oakton Street

Des Plaines, Illinois 60018-2187

847.699.2929 (fax) 847.296.92221

www.asse.org

THE VOICE FOR OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY,

HEALTH, AND ENVIRONMENTAL CONCERNS

Founded in 1911 and celebrating its 90th anniversary, the non-profit American Society of Safety Engineers (ASSE) is the world’s oldest and largest professional safety organization. ASSE is a global organization that works to advance the technical, scientific, managerial and ethical knowledge and skills of occupational safety, health and environmental professionals, and is committed to protecting people, property and the environment. ASSE provides such services as education, public affairs, government affairs, and involvement in national and international safety standards development, technical publications and timely and ongoing communications on safety advancements worldwide.

Its more than 30,000 members manage, supervise and consult on safety, health and environmental issues in all industries, government, insurance and education. Safety professionals work to prevent accidents, injuries and occupational diseases, create safer work and leisure environments and develop safer products. More information on ASSE and its programs can be found at www.asse.org.

GLOBAL IMPACT

ASSE has 149 chapters, 56 sections and 64 student sections within eight regions. There are members in 64 countries, including Saudi Arabia, the United Kingdom and Egypt. Chapters offer localized membership services, issue advocacy, networking and professional development opportunities through seminars, conferences, meetings, and newsletters.

PROVIDING QUALITY EDUCATION AND CAREER DEVELOPMENT

ASSE provides a comprehensive education program for members and non-members through the Society’s Professional Safety Academy (PSA). The Academy is known as the career partner of the participants, providing high quality programs based on the needs of the profession. Safety, health and environmental professionals gain the knowledge and skills to achieve career success and recognition. Education programs under the Professional

Safety Academy include the:

  • Annual Professional Development Conference (PDC): "Safety 2002: Advancing the EH&S Profession" (June 9-12, 2002 in Nashville, Tennessee);
  • Annual Management Symposium (spring/winter);
  • Hot Topic Symposia on emerging issues (fall);
  • SeminarFest: An annual collection of safety seminars (winter);
  • Management Seminars to support the ASSE "Certificate in Safety Management;"
  • Examination Preparation Workshops to support professional certification;
  • On-site seminars exportable to clients such as corporations; and
  • Self-Study Programs.

The Society is a significant publisher in the technical safety field and offers a variety of print and electronic resources supporting the career development of members of the profession. ASSE is a Certified Provider, awarded by the International Association of Continuing Education and Training (IACET), of continuing education and provides continuing education units for its education programs.

SERVING OUR MEMBERS

ASSE provides its members with a wide range of products and services, including:

  • The Online Community, which offers members online access to career services, as well as the membership directory and bulletin boards that enhance membership networking;
  • Professional Safety, the Society’s monthly peer-reviewed journal, features in-depth articles that cover a wide range of cutting edge topics, and focus on innovative research and analysis of successful, real-world applications;
  • Society Update, ASSE’s online member newsletter, outlines the latest ASSE activities, member

accomplishments, chapter and practice specialty news and ASSE communications;

  • Self-study courses prepare participants for certification examinations as well as continuing education credit via approved college credit by the American Council on Education;
  • Active, ongoing public relations/affairs/issue education programs that are international, national and state-specific;
  • Sponsorship of the annual North American Occupational Safety and Health Week (NAOSH) with the Canadian Society of Safety Engineering (CSSE) (NAOSH 2002 will be held May 5 – 11);
  • Proactive government affairs programs and activities;
  • Development of key national and international safety standards;
  • Academic standards for safety education and continuing education training seminars;
  • Technical publications and localized networking and professional recognition; and
  • Insurance programs (group medical & professional liability).

A LEADER IN SAFETY STANDARDS

ASSE is secretariat for eight American National Standards Institute (ANSI) committees and/or projects which include: A1264 on Walking/Working Surfaces, Z15 on Motor Vehicle Fleet Safety, Z87 on Eye and Face Protection, Z117 on Confined Space, Z359 on Fall Protection, Z390 on Hydrogen Sulfide Safety Training and Z490 on Safety, Health and Environmental Training. ASSE is also the secretariat for the Z590 project on Competence in the Safety Profession and is the Administrator for the U.S. Technical Advisory Group to the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) on fall protection standards. ASSE members also serve on 40 other safety and health standards committees.

At the university level, the ASSE Professional and Educational Standards Committee works to ensure a high standard of preparation for future safety professionals and that the content of academic programs meets the needs of the safety profession and those it serves. As a member of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET), ASSE encourages the inclusion of safety principles and courses into related engineering program curricula and establishes curriculum critical for associate, baccalaureate and master’s degree programs. ASSE also makes site visits to schools to accredit their safety programs. Nationally, 14 baccalaureate and master’s degree programs in safety have been accredited by ABET with ASSE as the sponsoring society.

 

ASSE PRACTICE SPECIALTIES

Through its 13 Practice Specialties, ASSE offers professional development opportunities and technical assistance to members and non-members. Practice Specialties are in the areas of: academics, construction, consultants, engineering, environmental, healthcare, industrial hygiene, international, management, mining, public sector, risk management/insurance and transportation. These serve as a forum for discussion of best practice strategies and research; influence relevant programs for professional certification, ASSE chapter-based programs and ASSE technical standards development; and, support advocacy efforts for occupational safety, health and environmental

leadership. Online technical information, contacts and referrals along with global involvement opportunities are also available.

AWARDS PROGRAMS

The Practice Specialties also support student activity by working with the ASSE Foundation’s student assistance program, sponsoring 14 students to attend ASSE’s June 2001 PDC in California.

ASSE awards programs honor outstanding accomplishments in the profession. The ASSE Fellow award, the Society’s highest honor, cites individuals with broad, significant and career-wide contributions to the profession and the Society. Other prestigious awards include the Edgar Monsanto Queeny Safety Professional of the Year (SPY) Award and the Mine Safety Appliances Outstanding Student Section Award.

THE ASSE FOUNDATION

Established in 1990, the ASSE Foundation is a 501(c) (3) charitable organization that advances occupational safety, health and environmental development, research and education in the public interest. The Foundation provides scholarships and funding for research throughout the year. Funding comes from ASSE chapters, individual members and corporations. Check www.asse.org for more Foundation information.

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