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Evaluating Safety Interventions

Articles

Title: Economic Impact of Occupational Safety and Health on States Within the European Union (1998)
Publisher: European Agency for Safety and Health at Work
Summary: This report describes the economic impact of occupational safety and health in the member states of the European Union since 1996. The aim of the project was intended to produce an overview of how economic factors are related to the formation of OSH policy in member states.
Resource: OSHA.europa.eu

Title: Effectiveness of Economic Incentives to Improve Occupational Safety and Health
Publisher: European Agency for Safety and Health at Work
Summary: Explores how economic incentives are potentially strong instruments in driving companies towards safety and health excellence because they reinforce the link with profitability.
Resource: OSHA.europa.eu

Title: Impact of Safety Efforts – Intervention Effectiveness: Phase 1 – Developing a Mathematical Relationship between Interventions & Incident Rates for the Design of a Loss Prevention System (2001)
Publisher: ASSE
Summary: Loss prevention and safety programs are often implemented without a quantified design. This two-phase study was designed to determine whether such a program could be quantified, then optimized through a design that minimizes the incident rate and the human resources needed to implement the program’s interventions.
Resource: PDF

Title: Impact of Safety Efforts – Intervention Effectiveness Research: Phase 2 – Design, Optimization, & Verification of the Loss Prevention System & Analysis Models (2001)
Publisher: ASSE
Summary: In Phase 2 of this empirical observation study, an attempt is made to determine whether a designed loss prevention program can be optimized to minimize the loss-producing incident rate.
Resource: PDF

Title: Intervention Effectiveness Research: A Review of the Literature on Leading Indicators (2003)
Publisher: American Chemical Society
Summary: The objective of this research literature review was to determine if there is a scientifically supported method or tool available to help ensure that safety and health programs are, in fact, effectively designed and optimally implemented. The review was done to determine if the leading indicator/intervention effectiveness research literature provides info necessary to build an analytic tool that allows valid measurement of the effectiveness of a complete safety and health program.
Resource: PDF

Title: A Research Model – Forecasting Incidence Rates from Optimized Safety Program Intervention Strategies (2005)
Publisher: National Safety Council
Summary: In order to determine the effectiveness of a particular intervention, or more importantly, of all the safety program interventions interacting together, one must determine the mathematical relationship between the intervention/s and the incident rate (what the interventions are intended to affect). These researchers proved that there was a statistically significant relationship between the interventions and the incident rate.
Resource: PDF

Title: Modeling Using Dynamic Variables – An Approach for the Design of Loss Prevention Programs (2009)
Publisher: Elsevier
Summary: This paper details implementing a computer program to furnish safety personnel with an empirical basis for designing loss prevention programs based on historical safety data.
Resource: PDF

Title: Intervention Effectiveness Research - Engineering Design of Safety and Health Programs by Optimizing Intervention Activity (2002)
Publisher: Joel Haight, PhD, P.E., CSP, CIH (Author)
Summary: Safety and health programs are often implemented without a quantified design. The objective of this study was to determine if a safety and health program could be quantified and optimized through a design that minimizes incident rates and the percentage of available human resources required to implement it.
Resource: DOC

Title: Leading Indicator Research: Understanding Industrial Safety Programs and Optimizing Their Component intervention Strategies
Publisher: Parameshwaran S. Iyer, M.S. and Joel Haight, PhD, P.E., CSP, CIH (Authors)
Summary: In the current study researchers establish mathematical relationships between the leading indicators (safety program intervention activity levels) and the trailing indicators (incident rates) and explore these relationships to optimize the safety and health program in case of one power company.
Resource: DOC

Title: Forecasting Incidence Rates Through Artificial Intelligence (2007)
Publisher: Abdullah AL-Mutairi, M.S and Joel Haight, PhD, P.E., CSP, CIH (Authors)
Summary: Using Neural Networks, which is a form of artificial intelligence, researchers attempt to determine and identify a relationship between safety intervention activity and the incident rate.
Resource: DOC

Title: Making the Business Case: Assessment of Safety Intervention and Optimization of Resource Allocation (2009)
Publisher: Samuel A. Oyewole, Ph.D. Candidate and Joel Haight, PhD, P.E., CSP, CIH (Authors)
Summary: This paper intends to provide an overview of a statistical technique to assess a safety intervention program from a business perspective.
Resource: PDF

Title: The Relationship Between OSH and Employee Morale
Publisher: Mike Behm, PhD, CSP
Summary: The purpose of this research endeavor was to analyze the relationship between OSH performance and employee morale, using the Great Place to Work® Institute’s lists (Best 100 large companies and Best 50 small/medium companies) as the construct for employee morale.
Resource: DOC

Title: Economic Analysis: Make the Business Case for SH&E (2009)
Publisher: ASSE
Summary: This article examines economic analysis as a way of making a business case for SH&E issues and practices. The authors explain that the issue of making a business case for SH&E is grounded in past work and describe what is needed to move this effort ahead. The rationale, benefits and barriers to incorporating economic analysis findings into SH&E investment proposals are then discussed, as is a blueprint for constructing an SH&E economic analysis model.
Resource: ASSE (pdf)

Title: Building a Case to Invest in OHS & Organizational Health (2009)
Publisher: Australian Government, Comcare
Summary: This publication outlines the elements of organizational health and the benefits employers can expect to receive from investing in organizational health initiatives. Not only do organizational strategies manage the risks of injury and disease, they also reduce costs, increase productivity, raise staff morale and enhance performance.
Resource: www.comcare.gov.au

Title: Ergonomic Investments (2009)
Publisher: ASSE
Summary: This article shares a plant-level analysis of an ergonomics intervention. The outcome is an exploratory protocol for educators, students and field practitioners to consider as they go about making the operational and economic implications of ergonomics investments more transparent.
Resource: ASSE (pdf)

Title: SH&E Heroes & the Actuary’s Chamber of Secrets (2008)
Publisher: ASSE
Summary: SH&E professionals must be able to read and understand the many reports presented by third-party claims administrators, auditors and actuaries. It is important to understand not only the risk control side of SH&E, but also the risk financing side.
Resource: ASSE (pdf)

Title: Reducing or Ignoring Workplace Safety During Business Downturns Costly, ASSE Notes (2008)
Publisher: ASSE
Summary: ASSE members caution employers against cutting back on workplace safety in times of economic difficulty.
Resource: ASSE

Title: SH&E Reporting Relationships (2008)
Publisher: ASSE
Summary: ASSE’s Business of Safety Committee (BoSC) surveyed a portion of the ASSE membership to better understand to whom SH&E professionals report. Members’ comments are featured in this article.
Resource: ASSE (pdf)

Title: Working Paper on the Quality of the Working Environment & Productivity (2004)
Publisher: European Agency for Safety & Health at Work
Summary: This working paper examines the link between a good working environment and productivity. A better understanding of positive effects of a good working environment would support the implementation of effective health and safety policy at company level. It would complement the set of rules and regulations with a significant parameter that is directly linked to the intrinsic motivation of a company. Companies must be convinced that making OSH objectives their own and integrating them into their own company objectives is worth the effort.
Resource: ASSE (pdf)