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ASSE’s Women in Safety Engineering Honor New Mexico’s Margaret Carroll as One of 100 Women Making a Difference in Safety

Posted in on Wed, Nov 30, 2011

DES PLAINES, IL (November
30, 2011) – As part of its 100th anniversary celebration this year,
the American Society of Safety Engineers’ (ASSE) Women in Safety Engineering
(WISE) common interest group has  honored
100 women from around the world for making a difference in occupational safety,
health and the environment (SH&E).  Margaret
Carroll, P.E., CSP of Cedar Crest, NM was one of those honored by ASSE for her
dedication to protecting people, property and the environment.

Carroll, who has worked in the safety profession for nearly
40 years, stumbled into the field straight out of college, almost by accident
she noted, when she went to the Boeing Company’s Aerospace Division and asked
them for a job. When they offered her a position in safety and health, she said
she would try anything for two weeks.

“I became so fascinated,” Carroll explained. “I thought
‘sign me up.’”

One of the first projects that Carroll participated in at
Boeing was the Apollo Moon Mission, which gave her the experience of having
safety built into a project’s concept and design stages.

“You do that for your first job, and you say, ‘what do I do
for an encore?’” she said.

Carroll found plenty of encores throughout her career,
following up her tenure at Boeing by earning a Bachelor’s degree in industrial
safety from Delgado Community College in New Orleans, and later a master’s in
engineering and industrial safety form Central Missouri State University.

In addition, Carroll spent 25 years building a team of some
of the world’s best safety professionals at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque,
NM.

She realized her dream of starting her own safety consulting
firm in 2003 when she founded Margaret M. Carroll, LLC.

Carroll also holds a prominent position in ASSE history,
having served as the Society’s first female president in 1995, and is an ASSE
Fellow, the Society’s highest honor.

In addition she is the current president of the board of
directors for the Board of Certified Safety Professionals (BCSP).

“There are some really accomplished women on the list,”
Carroll said of her honor as one of the WISE ‘100 Women, Making a Difference in
Safety’ project. “I feel like I’m in the presence of giants, and its humbling
to say the least.”

The ‘WISE 100 Women, Making a Difference in Safety’ project
honors women who, throughout history, have dedicated their careers to promoting
innovation in safety, health and environmental issues. The valuable
contributions of women to the SH&E profession have been recognized through
this project and later this year WISE will consolidate the profiles of all 100
honorees into a single publication, titled 100
Women, Making a Difference in the Safety, Health and Environmental Profession
as  part of ASSE’s (1911-2011) 100th
anniversary.

WISE was established to foster the advancement of women in
the SH&E profession.  The group
provides professional development opportunities, evaluates the ongoing state of
women in SH&E, mentors women in the profession, provides opportunities for
women to obtain professional certifications and promotes the development and peer
review of written material related to issues specific to women in the
SH&E  workplace.  For more information about WISE, the book and
upcoming events please visit www.asse.org/practicespecialties/wise/mission.php.

Founded in 1911, the 100-year-old Des Plaines, IL-based ASSE is the
oldest professional safety society and is committed to protecting people,
property and the environment. Its more than 33,000 occupational safety, health
and environmental professional members lead, manage, supervise, research and
consult on safety, health, transportation and environmental issues in all
industries, government, labor, health care and education. For more information please
view ASSE’s ‘Celebrating a Century of Safety’ video at www.asse.org/newsroom.



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